Can Too Much Calcium Be Harmful?

Calcium is essential to overall wellness, from strong bones and heart rhythm regulation to muscle contraction and relaxation. Achieving adequate calcium consumption is vital to lead a balanced life.

Your body needs about 1,000 mg of calcium per day, roughly the same amount found in a glass of milk or a serving of yogurt.

Increased Risk of Osteoporosis

Overly-consuming calcium can be detrimental, increasing your risk for osteoporosis – a disease that weakens bones and leads to fractures.

Osteoporosis’ main source of bone loss is reduced bone density. This occurs because your bones are constantly breaking down (resorbing) and forming new bones; until about age 25, this process added more bone than it removed, leaving you with a high peak bone mass. After age 50, however, bone-building slows considerably and bone breakdown outpaces formation.

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To maintain strong and healthy bones, you need nutrients like calcium and vitamin D. These can be found in dairy products and fatty fish. Unfortunately, taking too many supplements could your body from absorbing enough of this important mineral.

An excessive intake of calcium may increase blood levels (known as hypercalcemia) and thus your risk for osteoporosis, leading to kidney stones and bone fractures as well as spinal column curvature over time. This condition may even result in kidney stones.

To reduce the risk of osteoporosis, add calcium, vitamin D, and other minerals to your diet, and do weight-bearing exercises like walking, running, or weight lifting. Certain medical conditions and medications also increase your likelihood of osteoporosis.

Gender and family history play an integral part in assessing osteoporosis risk. Women are more prone than men to develop the condition; however, its symptoms may affect both genders equally.

Studies suggest that women of white or Asian descent have a higher risk of hip fractures due to their ethnicity, increasing the likelihood of osteoporosis. Studies suggest that women of white or Asian descent have a higher risk of hip fractures due to their ethnicity, increasing the likelihood of osteoporosis.

Age also plays a role in your osteoporosis risks. Osteoporosis tends to affect those over 50, although it can occur at any age.

Other risk factors for osteoporosis may include , drinking alcohol frequently, and eating a diet low in calcium and vitamin D. Certain health conditions and medications can make it harder for your bones to build bone naturally.

Kidney Stones

Kidney stones form when an excess of calcium accumulates in urine. Although kidneys usually eliminate excess calcium, an excess amount can bind with waste like oxalate to develop kidney complications or stones.

A small stone can pass harmlessly, but if it gets stuck in your kidney, ureter or bladder, it may cause pain.

The kidneys are fist-sized bean-shaped organs on either side of your spine that filter 120 to 150 quarts of blood daily to balance fluid levels and remove waste from your body. Once the kidneys have created urine, it travels via tube-shaped ureters to your bladder for processing.

People suffering from certain medical conditions and taking medications that disrupt digestion or intestinal absorption are at an increased risk for kidney stones. Hypercalciuria (excess calcium in the urine) is the most likely culprit – responsible for nearly 70% of kidney stones!

Other causes could include too much oxalate, produced in your liver and found in various fruits, vegetables, nuts and chocolate.

Oxalate can cause problems for people with small intestinal disorders such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis and those with metabolic conditions like renal tubular acidosis or diabetes.

If your diet or medical condition increases your risk for calcium stones, your doctor may advise reducing calcium intake by changing both. You should also drink enough fluids so your urine production stays adequate.

When you develop a stone, your doctor will conduct imaging tests to pinpoint its source. You may require an ultrasound of your kidney or CT scan of your bladder and ureter.

Your doctor may suggest noninvasive or minimally invasive solutions for treating stones, including percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) and shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). Ureteroscopy may be required if very large or complex stones do not respond to these removal methods.

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Heart Problems

Overloading on calcium can have serious adverse health repercussions. Too much calcium increases your risk for other conditions like high blood pressure, heart disease, and kidney stones.

Too much calcium (hypercalcemia) in your bloodstream can have detrimental effects on your heart’s rhythm and lead to abnormal electrical signals, which lead to irregular heartbeats.

Excess calcium in your blood can lead to problems by building up on your artery walls, potentially blocking blood flow and causing heart attack or stroke.

Excessive calcium in the bloodstream can lead to health issues. It can impede the formation of robust blood clots, resulting in heart attacks, strokes, or brain impairment.

If you have hypercalcemia, your doctor may advise taking calcium supplements to lower blood calcium levels and help protect the lungs, kidneys, bones, and joint health. Calcium build-up in your system can harm the lungs, kidneys, bones, and joints, causing issues for health and well-being.

Your body can only tolerate 600 milligrams of calcium at one time, so you must estimate how much you are getting through food sources before determining if additional supplementation may be needed, according to Dr. Ethel Siris of Columbia University Medical Center’s Toni Stabile Osteoporosis Center in New York City.

But she cautions that taking too much calcium without first consulting with your physician could prove dangerous. Instead, focus on getting adequate amounts through other sources, like milk, cheese, green vegetables, and fortified foods.

Recent studies indicate that people with high calcium levels in their arteries (known as coronary artery calcium, or CAC) have a higher risk of heart attacks and other health issues than those with low or no calcium buildup in their arteries.

Recent studies indicate that people with high calcium levels in their arteries (known as coronary artery calcium, or CAC) have a higher risk of heart attacks and other health issues than those with low or no calcium buildup in their arteries. A high CAC score signals more calcium deposits over a wider area and more frequently.

Depression

Too much calcium in your system can harm physical and mental health, including depression and .

Too much calcium can be detrimental for both women and men of all ages, with most instances occurring after menopause in women over age 50.

Hypercalcemia occurs when there is too much calcium in your blood. This condition can be life-threatening, so you should consult a healthcare provider immediately if this applies to you.

In most cases, this occurs because of an overactive parathyroid gland; however, it could also result from excessive calcium supplement intake.

An excess of calcium can be detrimental to both your heart and kidneys, leading to dysfunction and issues in their function. Furthermore, excessive calcium may impair brain functioning, causing confusion, lethargy, memory loss, and depression.

Your doctor will use blood tests to analyze your calcium levels and conduct other checks on your kidneys and heart.

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If your blood has an excess of calcium, your body adjusts how it absorbs and utilizes it to eliminate the excess calcium. This may lead to symptoms like an upset stomach, muscle spasms or cramping, bone pain, and weakness.

If your body doesn’t get enough to remove extra calcium deposits, you might get dehydrated, which can cause thirst, fatigue, and more frequent urination.

It’s crucial to inform your physician about your medications and supplements to determine possible interference with calcium supplements, which could reduce their effectiveness.

You may need to get your blood drawn and tested to check calcium levels or detect any infections or serious medical conditions. You may need to get your blood drawn and tested to check calcium levels or detect any infections or serious medical conditions.

Importantly, some cancers can contribute to excessive calcium in your blood. Multiple myeloma is one of the primary cancers responsible for hypercalcemia.

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